herbsThe weather in Sydney is consistently wet. It has been six days since I last posted a recipe, and the only excuse I have is the weather! Weather like this makes me want to cook and eat.

And repeat.

Blogging took a back seat while I busied myself baking (and eating) delicious Wintery foods that I thought I’d have to wait until next year to post.

flourI also got the chance to use some gluten free flour I was kindly given by Well & Good. I’d never baked with gluten free flour before (to be honest, I was pretty apprehensive!), but the result was perfect. The bread rose perfectly and crisped nicely. The gluten free flour seems to result in a slightly different tasting bread – not a bad taste, just slightly different to regular flour.


This recipe is one of those things. I’ve spoken before about my obsession with Parmesan, and this recipe combines Parmesan with garlic, another of my staunch favourites.

garlicThis recipe will make you the stinkiest, but must satisfied baker… and I’m not going to apologise for either of those things! It’s made for sharing, which I love, so your friends will be garlicky as well, don’t worry! It is relaxed and easy to make and eat; when serving, just tell people to tear away pieces as they please. It should be shared with friends as a starter to a fabulous, hearty meal. Or it can be served as an accompaniment to an evening of wine and cheese.

Gluten Free Garlic Parmesan Pull Apart Bread

  • 1 head of garliclight
  • 1 cup warm milk
  • 7g sachet of yeast
  • 3 cups plain gluten free flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 40g butter
  • 4 tbsp melted butter
    1 egg
  • 40g parmesan cheese

Plus:

  • 2 tbsp milk
  • 10-20g parmesan
  • 2 tsp mixed Italian herbs

Set your oven to 200°C and drizzle a small roasting tin with oil. Remove your garlic from their skins and pop them into the tray. Spray them with oil so that they don’t burn and put them on to roast for 20 minutes.

parmesanWhile the garlic is roasting, warm your milk for about a minute in the microwave and mix well. Add the yeast to it and set to one side. Mix the flour and salt together; I mixed mine with the bread hook attachment of Penelope, my stand mixer, because she does all the hard kneading work (later on in the recipe) for me.

doughMelt your butter and add it to the flour mixture, then add the egg and mix. Finely grate your parmesan and add it in as well.

By now, your garlic should be nice a squishy and roasted. Remove them from the oven and leave the oven on. Transfer the cloves into a bowl and mash them with a fork (don’t burn yourself!) If any bits of the skin are floating about in your garlic mash, discard them now, then add the mash to the bowl.

Pour half of the yeast liquid into the dry ingredients and mix until a dry dough has formed. Add the rest of the liquid and mix until a thick dough has formed. Continue to mix with the bread hook so that the bread is nicely kneaded and forms a good, cohesive dough.

uncookedGrease two shallow cake tins (I used sandwich tins) and place them next to your bowl of dough. Grab small amounts of the dough and roll them into balls, then plonk them into the greased tins. I rolled about 20 balls of varying sizes and put 10 in each tin – I prefer to make them of varied sizes, I think this gives the resulting bread a lovely rustic touch, and it means that it looks a little bit unique each time you make it. Also, when you’re arranging them in the tins, don’t worry about being neat, just make sure they’re about 2cm away from each other so that they rise and gently nestle against one another, instead of being squashed.

Brush each ball with a small amount of milk, then sprinkle with parmesan and herbs as desired.

flagPop them in the oven for 20-23 minutes. I turned the fan on in my oven for the last minute of cooking to make sure they were lovely and brown on top.

Of course, these lovely morsels don’t have to be gluten free, regular flour will do the same job, but if you specifically make it gluten free, make sure part-goers know – I used these cute little flags from Allergy Riders!

6 comments

    1. I promise you, they are really good! What a coincidence; I’m also considering cutting back on gluten, so I’ll be posting a few more gluten free bakes in the coming weeks. Best of luck with sorting out your son’s diet!

  1. Is there a reason why there is no period of letting the yeasty dough rest and rise before being beaten down and left to rise again?

    1. Hi PH,
      the only real reason is that I’m impatient, and I love being able to eat things as quickly as possible! I imagine that you could do it your way and the bread would work out just fine – let me know how it turns out if you do!

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